good
Asana is a fast and highly polished project management all-rounder that is equally suitable for simple projects and complex processes. It offers powerful automation and reporting capabilities.
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Advanced Features
9.4 / 10
Configuration & Usage
9.4 / 10
Dokumentation & Support
8.6 / 10
Tasks & Planning
8.6 / 10
Collaboration & Communication
6.6 / 10
Project Management Software

Asana Review 2024: The Most User-Friendly Project Management Tool?

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Teamwork used to mean everyone was in the same room—today, team members often aren't even in the same country. This makes it all the more crucial for teams to stay organized and connected. Asana claims to be able to help with both.

In this in-depth look at Asana we let you know who the project management platform is for and what it does better (and worse) than its competitors.

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What Is Asana?

Asana is a project management tool developed by US-based Asana Inc. The company was founded by two former Facebook staffers who learned first-hand how much time a growing company wastes on busy work.

To reduce busy work, they developed a tool that helps teams stay on top of upcoming tasks and focus on what's important. Asana was launched in 2012 and is now used by more than 100,000 businesses and millions of teams.

But does Asana actually make it easier for teams to work together? Or is it just another tool that workers have to learn for their manager's sake? Read on to find out.

Asana Review

Review
8.5
good
Visit Website*
Advanced Features
9.4 / 10
Configuration & Usage
9.4 / 10
Dokumentation & Support
8.6 / 10
Tasks & Planning
8.6 / 10
Collaboration & Communication
6.6 / 10
  • Excellent user interface
    Asana's interface is one of the best on the market: Sleek, well-organized, and easy to navigate.

  • Comprehensive automations
    With its powerful workflows and rules, Asana makes it easy to automate routine tasks and save time.

  • Plenty of views and task features
    Asana supports the most important views (list, board, timeline, and calendar) and advanced task features, like subtasks and dependencies.

  • Versatile reports
    Thanks to its pre-made and customizable real-time diagrams, you can easily transform bland project data into impressive visualizations and summaries.

  • No premium plan for individuals
    Freelancers can definitely benefit from Asana - it's a shame the platform doesn't have a pricing plan specifically for them. There's a two-licence limit.

  • Limited collaboration features
    The platform does not offer chat features and is not well-suited for real-time communication and collaboration.

  • Lack of custom fields
    Compared to other solutions, Asana offers relatively few custom field options. This impacts how much you can personalize tasks.

1.

Configuration & Usage

To start, you'll need an Asana account (free). Just register with a valid email address and answer a few questions about yourself and how you intend to use Asana.

Once registration is complete, you can set up your first project with the help of an AI assistant. This also serves as a kind of tutorial, since Asana shows you its basic features along with the most important layouts and views.

Create your first project when finishing up the registration process.

Once registered, you'll start a 30-day trial phase during which all of Asana's premium features are available. Once this period wraps up, you'll be switched to the free version, unless you purchase a subscription.

Everything in One Place

Asana's interface does a good job of balancing the amount of information against clarity and is divided into four main areas:

  • 1.

    Menu bar: Running along the interface's left side, the menu provides access to the platform's various features and areas. All tasks, projects, goals, teams, folders, and more can be found here.

  • 2.

    Upper bar: Here, you can click on "Create" to quickly set up a new task or project. Alternatively, use the search bar in the middle or access billing and account info, as well as an admin panel further to the right.

  • 3.

    Header: This displays the most important features, along with views and filters for the project you're currently working on.

  • 4.

    Main area: All information about the project you're working on will be displayed here in the view that you've selected.

Asana's user-friendly interface checks many of our boxes and also appeals to beginners.

Use Case Example: Content Creation

Platforms like Asana are suitable for a range of different projects and workflows. This makes it hard to compare providers since every team works and uses project management software differently.

We tested the platforms from our review series according to a specific use case - Content creation for a website like EXPERTE.com. With that said, we also refer to other aspects and usage contexts.

When you click on a task within a project, a detailed window will open. This includes the task's most important information, such as its due date, priority, and dependencies (should it have any).

You can add custom fields to your tasks, which we'll discuss in greater detail below in the next section.

You'll find the most important information about your tasks in its detailed menu.

Project Organization With Asana

When you use Asana, tasks and projects are the most important organizational levels. The platform's hierarchy consists of five such levels, which are easy to understand and process from largest to smallest:

  • 1.

    Goals: Specify one of these for your entire organization or a single team. This could be increasing the number of visitors to a website, or providing a client with their finished product.

  • 2.

    Portfolios: These are groups of related projects, such as those that contribute towards meeting a goal or target.

  • 3.

    Projects: Concrete activities or initiatives that consist of multiple tasks and subtasks.

  • 4.

    Tasks: Every task represents a specific activity within a project that is to be completed by a team member.

  • 5.

    Subtasks: Tasks, in turn, can consist of subtasks that help to break down more complex undertakings into easier-to-manager deliverables.

Specify a goal that your project will work towards.

Asana's Views

You can visualize projects in Asana in many different ways. To alternate between views, go to the header bar and select an existing view or create a new one.

Asana offers nearly all the most common views, along with a few additional options. Here's what's available:

  • Overview: This summarizes all basic details about a project on a single page. Use this to quickly see project roles, measure important resources, and track goals, milestones, and portfolios.

  • Board: With this, you're provided with a Kanban board. It divides your project into phases and allows for tasks to be dragged and dropped between them.

Asana's Kanban-esque board view.

  • List: This view groups tasks into previously defined sections and lists them one under another. The List view is not unlike a table view, to which you can add task information as a column.

In the List view, tasks are displayed in table form.

  • Timeline: With this, your tasks are visualized as time blocks (or bars). Any project task with a due date or timespan is shown. This allows you to see how different tasks flow together and helps to monitor progress.

Asana's Timeline view makes it easier to plan a project's timeframe.

  • Gantt: The Gantt view is also a kind of timeline, even though it's more complex and contains extra information about individual tasks and their dependencies.

    Whereas the Timeline view provides a general overview of a project's progress, the Gantt view helps better plan and organize a structured project.

Asana's Gantt view.

  • Files: This view shows all attachments and notifications on a single page.

  • Calendar: The project calendar can be displayed either in weekly or monthly intervals and offers an overview of upcoming project deadlines and milestones.

Asana's Calendar view.

Asana covers all of the most important views. If you'd like to organize tasks in a table, you might be disappointed with Asana's Lists view and prefer Airtable or Smartsheet options.

Another downside is that you can't add geographic dimensions to your project, like with ClickUp or monday.

Below, we've provided an overview of Asana's basic features:

AsanaClickUpTeamworkmondayAirtableSmartsheetNotionWrikeTrelloBasecampMeisterTask
List
Table
Kanban
Gallery
Calendar
Timeline
Gantt
Mindmap
Milestones
Workload
Map
Total
8
10
8
8
8
7
7
6
5
3
2

Asana for Mobile Devices

Asana offers a mobile app for project management on the go. It displays your projects and tasks in a simplified List, Board, or Calendar view. You can also create new projects and tasks.

The app is best suited for checking upcoming tasks, adding new ones, or changing responsibilities from anywhere. Since you don't have access to the platform's full range of features, we prefer the web application.

Asana's mobile app is available for Android and iOS.

Straightforward, Elegant, and Intuitive for Beginners

Asana's user interface is sleek and modern, but there's much more to it than just looks: It also works very well.

Despite how much information it provides, you won't get lost since areas are neatly organized and there aren't any delays or loading times to contend with.

Even team members who aren't well-versed in project management tools will quickly become comfortable with Asana. Taken together, its interface is one of the best on the market.

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Configuration & Usage
9.4 / 10
2.

Tasks & Planning

Tasks are Asana's most important organizational level for everyday use: Each activity performed within a project should be added as a task or subtask.

Create and Edit Tasks

There are several ways to add new tasks. You can click on "Create" in the interface's upper left or add the task directly to the project.

After that, give it a name and assign it to a team member. Only one person can be assigned responsibility for a task, however, there can be multiple contributors/collaborators.

There are several different ways to add new tasks to Asana.

In addition, you'll have plenty of choices for editing tasks. In the Lists view, task attributes can be completed in table form. However, you can also click on a task to open a detailed window.

There, you'll find all of the most important options: Due date, priority, project status, along with dependencies and subtasks (if any). You'll also see all contributors and can share comments with them.

Click on a task to adjust its attributes.

Custom Fields in Asana

Do you need more than the presets for your project's tasks? No problem: You can add custom fields to any task. Just click on the "+" symbol in the upper right (List view):

Add custom fields to your tasks.

Next, name the field, select what type it is from the dropdown menu, and, if necessary, adjust any of the other parameters.

Custom fields can be created locally at the project or portfolio levels, or added to the global field library. To do the latter, check the box next to "Add to [Company Name's] field library".

Custom fields in Asana.

Fewer Field Options Than Elsewhere

Asana offers basic field types (text, numbers, and single/muti-select) and forms. However, compared to the other tools we reviewed, options are limited.

Table-based platforms like Airtable and Smartsheet simply provide much more, as you can see in our comparison table below:

AsanaAirtablemondayNotionClickUpWrikeSmartsheetTeamworkTrelloMeisterTaskBasecamp
Text
Number
Single Select
Gallery
Checkbox
Date
Person
Currency
Percent
Duration
Progress
Rating
Files
Date
Relationships
Rollup
Total
8
16
14
13
12
10
9
6
5
3
0

Goals and Milestones in Asana

You can further solidify your tasks within Asana's organizational hierarchy by defining goals and milestones. Here's how they differ from one another:

  • Goals are specific targets that your organization wants to reach. They aren't tied to projects but applied across the entire company or team. To access the goal area, head to the sidebar menu.

  • Milestones indicate progress within a project. Set a new milestone by clicking the down arrow next to the "Add task" button and selecting "Add milestone". Alternatively, you can convert a task into a milestone.

    The only way milestones differ from tasks in Asana is how they are displayed in the interface's views.

Milestones in Asana.

Subtasks and Dependencies

Moving down the hierarchy, you can break tasks down further into subtasks and sub-subtasks. Every subtask can be assigned to a different collaborator, who will then complete it (and other subtasks) with their colleagues.

Dependencies between tasks can also be indicated. For this, you'll have two options: Tasks can either block a particular task or subtask or be blocked by other tasks/subtasks.

In this way, you can better schedule the sequence in which tasks are completed and let team members know when they can start on a particular assignment.

Indicate dependencies between tasks to optimize the order in which they are worked on.

So far as additional task features are concerned, Asana does nearly everything right. Below, you can see a comparison of its features:

AsanaClickUpWrikeTeamworkSmartsheetmondayNotionTrelloMeisterTaskAirtableBasecamp
Custom Fields
Subtasks
Task Dependencies
Milestones
Goals
Total
5
5
4
4
4
4
3
2
2
1
0

Asana makes it possible to not just comprehensively describe and visualize tasks, but also to organize them within a project's hierarchy. You can break them down into subtasks and indicate how they impact one another.

Our only complaint is that there could be more custom field types.

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Tasks & Planning
8.6 / 10
3.

Collaboration & Communication

Asana is meant for teams. This is even visible in its pricing structure, as a minimum of two licenses must be purchased. Most of its features are designed with collaboration in mind.

If you're working in a team, one of the first things you'll do in Asana is invite collaborators to your company/organization.

Add Collaborators

The easiest way to add new team members to your Asana account is by clicking "Invite" in the bottom left. After that, you'll be able to send them an invitation either via email or link.

New collaborators can then be added to a team, along with that team's portfolios and projects.

Invite your team members to Asana.

Asana has three main user types:

  • 1.

    Member: These are your colleagues and enjoy full access to your Asana portfolios and projects. Each teammate needs a unique license. Those who sign up with your company's email domain will be automatically approved.

    Those with different email domains can be added as well, however, it will take slightly longer for them to be included.

  • 2.

    Guest: This type is for external users, like customers or freelancers. They have limited access and can only view projects or areas that they have been approved for.

  • 3.

    Member with limited access: Some team members don't have access to all of a team's projects. Instead, they'll see and access only projects and tasks that are assigned to them.

Project Collaboration in Asana Teams

You can subdivide your Asana organization into teams, just like your company. Teams consist of multiple members who all contribute to the same project.

There are three visibility levels for teams. They can be: (1) visible and open to anyone, (2) visible to anyone, but only joined by request, or (3) private and membership by invitation only.

Create teams for your co-collaborators.

Collaboration on Asana: Project-Based Exchanges

Once your teammates are on Asana, you can jointly work on tasks and projects. The platform focuses on project-based collaboration: You can assign each other tasks, discuss them in comments, tag others, and share likes.

There are also a few messaging features: You can message one or more members, or set up quick, automatic notifications. Use the "Teams" area (sidebar menu) to contact all team or project members.

Send messages to your entire team.

Not for Chatting

All the same, Asana sticks to the basics: Conversations and messaging features focus on projects, teams, and tasks, which are the platform's strengths.

Asana messaging features aren't designed for quick exchanges. As such, it won't be able to replace a communication platform like Slack.

The platform has relatively few advanced collaboration features: There's no forum feature, Wikis (like what Basecamp offers), or the ability to jointly edit documents and whiteboards in real-time (like with ClickUp or monday).

Here's a comparison of Asana's collaboration features:

AsanaTeamworkBasecampClickUpmondayNotionWrikeSmartsheetMeisterTaskAirtableTrello
Usergroups
Private Messages
Group Chat
Message Board
Whiteboard
Docs
Wiki
Total
3
6
6
5
4
3
1
1
1
1
0

Asana is designed for teams and does well when it comes to working together on projects or tasks. For directly communicating, however, Asana lags behind several other tools from our review series.

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Collaboration & Communication
6.6 / 10
4.

Advanced Features

Asana includes many advanced features, many of which might not be visible at first glance.

Create Forms With Asana

You can create forms for any project with Asana and use them to gather important information and data. These can be designed for internal usage by teammates or external, third parties.

To access the form editor, click "Customize" in the upper right of the Projects page (sidebar menu).

Each form is assigned to a project.

Use the editor to name and describe your forms, add a cover image, and drag and drop questions.

You'll find all of the most common field types: Text (lines and blocks), numbers, single or multi-select, dates, attachments, and email addresses. In addition, you can add headers to further segment the form.

Asana's form editor.

You can assign responsibility for the form to one of your teammates and specify who can see it. In addition, you'll get a link and embed code for the form.

Whenever someone completes the form, it will be shown as a new task in the project it's attached to. This allows you to effectively gather and utilize data.

Reports and Statistics in Asana

Speaking of gathering information: Use Asana's reporting feature to visualize project data for many different purposes.

Simply click on "Reporting" in the sidebar menu to the left and the "General Dashboard" will open. Here, you'll find an overview of all the charts and diagrams you've created, and be able to add new ones.

It is possible to combine different diagrams or charts on a single page to emphasize particular real-time metrics for your audience (i.e. performance data for your supervisors).

Summarize real-time data in a single dashboard.

Asana offers a few ready-made charts that you can directly integrate into your dashboard, divided into the categories "Resourcing", "Work health", and "Progress".

However, it's also possible to add custom charts. For these, you can adjust the diagram's style, its reporting focus, axes, and filters.

Asana offers a variety of different pre-made charts.

As such, Asana offers plenty of options for visualizing data and filtering results. These, in turn, provide greater insight into how your projects are progressing.

Automations Through Workflows and Rules

During projects, many routine tasks and workflows go through the same steps every time they occur.

With Asana, you can automate these processes, saving your organization time and allowing your teammates to focus on what's important. There are two main tools for doing this: Workflows and rules.

Workflows are cross-team work processes that always follow the same pattern. In the "Workflow" screen of your project, you can automate these processes with the Workflow Builder.

You'll do this by breaking down each workflow into different segments, representing each of the project's phases.

Automate your processes with workflows.

You can further define workflow phases with rules. These are automated processes that follow the logic of "When x happens, y occurs". Each rule consists of a trigger and an action.

The trigger can be optionally bound to certain conditions that need to be met for the rule to be activated. Asana offers several pre-defined rules for common processes, such as the creation of subtasks or the shifting of tasks.

However, you can also create your own rules using the available triggers, conditions, and actions. It's possible to integrate external programs (like Slack or Google Calendar) into these.

This makes it possible, for example, to automatically send a message to a Slack channel when a task is completed.

Use the pre-defined rules, or create your own.

Asana's clever fusing of rules and workflows makes the platform's automation features all the more powerful and excellent for visualizing a variety of different workflows and processes.

Since there are so many ready-made templates, using them isn't difficult either.

Asana's AI Features: Nice, but Nothing Special

By now, Asana has integrated a few AI features into its platform. For these, Asana uses its own, proprietary machine-leaning model, as well as third-party language models, like OpenAI and Anthropic.

The platform's AI features mostly help in terms of project administration: You can generate personalized suggestions for your tasks or teams based on filter models.

The OpenAI models are primarily used in the comments area: Use them to summarize tasks and discussions or reply with automatic answers to questions. It's also possible to query the AI about project progress:

Ask Asana Intelligence questions about your project.

The AI features are nice, but it seems like Asana added them solely to be able to say that they integrated AI into their platform: None of them are indispensable.

Huge Selection of Integrations

It's possible to integrate other cloud-based tools that you and your team use into Asana, and there's plenty to choose from: There are hundreds of apps available beyond the basics like Google, Microsoft, Slack, and Salesforce.

And, if you still can't find what you're looking for, Asana offers an API for self-designed integrations.

Asana supports a huge selection of integrations.

Comparing Asana's Advanced Features

And there's still more! Asana offers resource management tools (such as those for time tracking) and security features like its Audit Suite.

For an overview of Asana's additional features, check out our comparison table below:

AsanaAirtableBasecampClickUpMeisterTaskmondayNotionSmartsheetTeamworkTrelloWrike
Forms
Automation
Time Tracking
Integrations
Charts
Reporting
API

There's more to Asana than just task and project management. We particularly liked its approach to automations, and the versatility its combination of rules/workflows offers.

For reporting, there's lots of room for flexibility and customization too thanks to the user-defined dashboards and charts.

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Advanced Features
9.4 / 10
5.

Documentation & Support

Asana provides a well-stocked Help Center filled with tutorials, video guides, and case studies.

The videos are particularly effective at informing and introducing beginners to the platform's basic features. Its articles include plenty of GIFs and other visualizations too.

Beyond that, Asana provides a few onboarding courses in its Academy, as well as regular live training, and a community forum.

Asana's Help Center.

Subscribers (regular, non-Enterprise users) can only get direct support through filing a ticket. There's no live chat or hotline. Our support ticket was answered to our satisfaction within 5 hours.

More support channels would be nice, but the speed and quality of the support we received during testing were solid.

Visit Website*
Dokumentation & Support
8.6 / 10
6.

Pricing

Asana offers five subscriptions, three of which are for smaller teams, while two are for larger businesses.

  • The free Personal subscription is designed for individuals or small teams who can make do without additional features. It includes unlimited tasks, projects, messages, and file storage (up to 100 MB).

    Keep in mind that you won't have all views (no Gantt) or features (no workflows, custom fields, or forms).

  • Growing teams can take advantage of the Starter subscription. It enables up to 500 teammates to collaborate on a project and includes Gantt charts, project dashboards, and the Workflow Builder.

    Automations are limited to 250 per month.

  • Advanced subscribers get even more features, such as portfolios, resource management, as well as extra reports, and approvals. Up to 25,000 automations are possible per month.

The Starter and Advanced subscriptions aren't ideal for individuals as at least two licenses must be purchased to use them.

  • Beyond those, Asana offers two Enterprise subscriptions, which are intended for larger organizations with complex needs. They include additional admin and security controls along with Data Loss Prevention (DLP) support.

We've prepared an overview of Asana's subscriptions here:

BasicPremiumBusiness
Monthly Price $0.00 from $10.99 from $24.99
Price per additional user - + $10.99 + $24.99
Contract Period (Months) 0 1 - 12 1 - 12
Limits
Number of Users 15 unlimited unlimited
Number of Projects unlimited unlimited unlimited
Number of Tasks unlimited unlimited unlimited
Number of Automations 0 unlimited unlimited
Views
List
Table
Kanban
Gallery
Calendar
Timeline
Gantt
Mindmap
Workload
Map
Tasks
Custom Fields
Subtasks
Task Dependencies
Milestones
Goals
Collaboration
Usergroups
Private Messages
Group Chat
Message Board
Whiteboard
Docs
Wiki
Advanced Features
Forms
Automation
Time Tracking
Integrations
Charts
Reporting
API

So, how does Asana's pricing stack up against the competition? The answer depends on your needs.

The free version is relatively generous, offering unlimited tasks and projects, as well as collaboration with up to 10 teammates. A premium subscription is more expensive than other tools with similar features though.

Take a look at our ranking below to see how all of the project management platforms featured in our test fared. To compare them, we chose the subscription that included 10 users and unlimited projects:

1.
Asana
Basic
$0.00
yearly price
2.
Wrike
Free
$0.00
yearly price
3.
Trello
Standard
$600.00
yearly price
4.
Teamwork
Starter
$718.80
yearly price
5.
ClickUp
Unlimited
$840.00
yearly price
6.
Smartsheet
Pro
$840.00
yearly price
7.
monday
Basic
$960.00
yearly price
8.
Notion
Plus
$960.00
yearly price
9.